What happens when the shale boom goes boom? – The great oil swindle

Published on Le Monde Diplomatique, english edition, by Nafeez Mosaddeq Ahmed, March 2013.

The shale gas revolution was meant to bring lasting prosperity. But the result of the gas glut may be just a bubble, producing no more than a temporary recovery that masks deep structural instability.

Recent headlines in the US press about the coming economic boom heralded by the shale gas revolution would lead you to think we are literally swimming in oil. A spate of reports last year, in particular the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) World Energy Outlook (WEO) in November 2012, forecast that the US will outstrip Saudi Arabia as the world’s largest oil producer by 2017, becoming, as Reuters put it, “all but self-sufficient in net terms” in energy production. 

According to the IEA, the projected increase in oil production from 84 mbpd (million barrels per day) in 2011 to 97 mbpd in 2035 will come “entirely from natural gas liquids and unconventional sources” — largely shale oil and gas — while conventional oil output will begin to fall from 2013 … //

… Dodgy economics of fracking:

  • The overestimation of reserve sizes is being used by oil industry majors to obscure the dodgy economics of fracking. Apart from the harmful effects on the environment, the problem is one of production rates, which start high but fall fast. In Nature, former UK chief government scientist Sir David King, co-writing with scientists from his Oxford Smith School of Enterprise & the Environment, noted that production at wells drops off by as much as 60-90% within the first year (4).
  • Such a rapid decline has made shale gas distinctly unprofitable. As production declines, operators are forced to drill new wells to sustain production levels and service debt. Rocketing production at inception, combined with the economic slowdown, drove US natural gas prices from about $7-8 per million cubic feet in 2008 down to less than $3 per million cubic feet in 2012.
  • Finance specialists have not been taken in. “The economics of fracking are horrid,” writes US financial journalist Wolf Richter in Business Insider  (5). “Drilling is destroying capital at an astonishing rate, and drillers are left with a mountain of debt just when decline rates are starting to wreak their havoc. To keep the decline rates from mucking up income statements, companies had to drill more and more, with new wells making up for the declining production of old wells. Alas, the scheme hit a wall, namely reality.”
  • Arthur Berman, a petroleum geologist who worked with Amoco (before its merger with BP) says that “the decline rates [of the] shale reservoirs experience … are incredibly high” (6). Citing the Eagle Ford shale site in Texas (the “mother of all shale oil plays”), he points out that the “annual decline rate is higher than 42%.” Just to keep production flat, they will have to drill “almost 1,000 wells in the Eagle Ford shale, every year… Just for one play, we’re talking about $10bn or $12bn a year just to replace supply. I add all these things up and it starts to approach the amount of money needed to bail out the banking industry. Where is that money going to come from?”

It’s all in the red: … //

… Worst-case scenario:

  • Nonetheless, it is not ruled out that several large oil companies could find themselves facing financial distress simultaneously. If that happens, according to Berman, “you may have a couple of big bankruptcies or takeovers and everybody pulls back, all the money evaporates, all the capital goes away. That’s the worst-case scenario.”
  • In other words, the premise of “peak oil” — the point at which geological constraints and economic factors will combine to make the black stuff more difficult and expensive to produce — is far from undermined by the shale gas boom. Several independent scientific studies released over the last year — largely ignored by the media — vindicate this conclusion.
  • In a study in Energy Policy, Sir David King and his Oxford team concluded that the oil industry had overstated world reserves by about a third, and estimates should be downgraded from 1,150-1,350 billion barrels to 850-900 billion barrels. “While there are certainly vast amounts of fossil fuel resources left in the ground, the volume of oil that can be commercially exploited at prices the global economy has become accustomed to is limited and will soon decline” (10).
  • King and co, in their Nature paper, found that despite reported increases in unconventional oil and gas production by fracking, depletion of the world’s existing fields is still running at 4.5-6.7% a year. They categorically dismissed notions that a shale gas boom would avert an energy crisis. And US financial risk analyst Gail Tverberg found that since 2005 “world [conventional] oil supply has not increased”, that this was “a primary cause of the 2008-2009 recession” and the “expected impact of reduced [conventional] oil supply” will mean the “financial crisis may eventually worsen” (11). That is not all: a new report from the New Economics Foundation warned that the arrival of “economic peak oil” — when the cost of supply “exceeds the price economies can pay without significantly disrupting economic activity” — will occur around 2014/15 (12).
  • Following a hugely successful industry PR offensive, journalists and policymakers have largely ignored these studies. But the upshot is simple: Rather than ushering in a new wave of lasting prosperity, the eventual consequence of the gas glut is likely to be an unsustainable shale bubble, fuelling a temporary recovery that masks deeper structural instabilities. When the bubble bursts under the weight of its own debt obligations, there will be a collapse in supply and a spike in prices, with serious economic consequences.

(full text).

Dr Nafeez Mosaddeq Ahmed is executive director of the Institute for Policy Research & Development IPRD in London;

His latest book is A User’s Guide to the Crisis of Civilization, and how to save it;

The Cutting Edge
, Nafeez Ahmed’s personal blog;

the crisis of civilization.com: official website of the documentary film featuring Dr. Nafeez Ahmed;

more of Nafeez Mosaddeq Ahmed articles on Le Monde Diplomatique;

Nafeez Mosaddeq Ahmed on en.wikipedia.

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