Life Expectancy in Sub-Saharan Africa is Lower Now Than 30 Years Ago

Excerpt: … Human development in sub-Saharan Africa has stagnated while progress in other parts of the world has accelerated, widening the gap between the world’s richest and poorest countries, warns this year’s United Nations Human Development Index (HDI), which finds life expectancy in the region lower today than 30 years ago mainly because of the ravages of HIV/AIDS. … // … “In the 31 countries at the bottom of the list, 28 of which are in sub-Saharan Africa, a person can hope to live on average only 46 years, or 32 years less than the average life expectancy in countries of advanced human development, with 20 years slashed off life expectancy due to HIV/AIDS,” according to a UNDP press release.

“The countries at the top and bottom of the rankings in the 2006 HDR are unchanged from the 2005 HDR; Norway ranks highest, while Niger is last of the countries for which sufficient information is available. People in Norway are more than 40 times wealthier than people in Niger and they live almost twice as long.”

This year’s index also provides a snapshot of the disparities between income groups within countries, showing for example that children born into the poorest 20 per cent of households in Indonesia are four times more likely to die before their fifth birthday than children born into the richest 20 per cent of families. In Bolivia, the richest 20 per cent of people rank in the upper echelons of human development, alongside Poland, while the poorest 20 per cent equate to the average HDI for Pakistan. Poland and Pakistan are separated by 97 places on the global HDI ranking.
(Read the whole article on News Blaze).

Comments are closed.